“I’m Boycotting Fear” by John Pavlovitz

A brilliant read. Reblogged.

“I am saying no to the politics of fear that imagine a thousand terrors lurking in restrooms and around corners, to perpetuate the necessary narrative of a sky that is always falling.”

I’m Boycotting Fear


The thing about revenge is

tumblr_nxhfzsrSsd1shyytzo1_1280The people who have earned it know full well that they deserve it.

They will spend many waking hours wondering and worrying about just when and where and how it will be exacted.

The wronged party may not ever need to lift a finger. That wondering and worrying may be sufficient punishment all on its own.

Or not.

That’s the thing the people who have earned it will never know.


Yup.

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Image from twitter


I know a sweet little French bulldog named Lou who needs an MRI.

Image from youcaring.com

You know I love dogs, and Lou is one of the best. He has his own Facebook page here.

Every moment of quality time he can spend with his family is precious.

If you can help in even a small way, even to pass the word along, please find it in your heart to do so. Lou is worth it.

Go here.


A remarkable thing is happening in New Hampshire.

Image from Facebook

A remarkable thing is happening in New Hampshire. Community members, students, and supporters from all over are challenging a decision by a local school board to keep the school from presenting the play “Sweeney Todd.” Click here for more.


Past masters: Bill Hicks

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Suspended Coffees.

Images from thesuspendedcoffees.wordpress.com

One of the coolest ideas I’ve seen in a long time.

Suspended Coffees is the advanced purchase of a cup of coffee. It is a pay-it-forward, anonymous act of charity and kindness. Suspended coffee or pending coffee (caffè sospeso) is a cup of coffee, paid for in advance by a willing coffee shop customer, as an anonymous act of charity for anyone who is in need and with less fortune.

The idea originated in Naples, Italy around 100 years ago. Customers of coffee shops would pay twice for one espresso, instructing the barista to log the paid but untaken beverage in an “in suspense” chart (caffè pagato or a caffè sospeso). The barista would record what the patron paid for, such as an espresso, cappuccino, or even a pastry. Paid items would remain in the log book until someone less fortunate would come and inquire if there was anything paid for or in suspense. The barista would check the log and say, “Yes, there is a paid cappuccino. May I serve it to you?” The beauty of this form of charity was multifaceted.

Read more about it here.